A Post-Christmas Road Trip

This Christmas we enjoyed being closer to family, just as we did over Thanksgiving weekend.  I enjoyed having all of my kids together for the holiday. We had fun.

Our two college-aged daughters came to stay for Christmas here in Georgia, and then we planned to all go to visit my parents and in-laws in Alabama over New Year’s weekend.

My husband and I disagreed about the post-Christmas road trip. I wanted to leave on Friday afternoon after he’d gotten off work, so we could arrive at my mother’s house late that evening. He wanted to get up early Saturday morning and make the trip in daylight.

(I do not care for any plan that involves the words “get up early.”)

Since we had to take two cars anyways, as our daughter had driven her car from college and we’d need the minivan for ourselves. we decided to split the trip.

I left Friday afternoon with the three older girls, and he planned to leave Saturday morning with the twins.

This seemed like a win-win situation to me. I would get to take a road trip with the teens listening to fun music and having girl talk. I’d be The Late-Night Cool Mom.

He’d rather go in the morning? Fine. He’d have to do the getting up early and forcing the kids into the car thing. He’d have to listen to the twins complain and/or fight the whole trip.

But it turned out my husband had a plan to avoid all that….

On Saturday morning I was still in bed at my mother’s house when my husband arrived with the twins. I couldn’t believe he’d gotten there so quickly!

I woke up to see Little Boy’s face inches from mine. He looked quite pleased with himself.

“Oh, hi,” I said. “You must have gotten up early this morning!”

Grinning, he shook his head.

“What?” I said, confused. “You didn’t get up early this morning?”

He grinned even more widely. “Nope!”

“What?” I said again.

His grin was getting maniacal. “I didn’t get up this morning at all!” he crowed.

I groaned. It was too early for riddles. “You mean you’re still asleep?”

He howled with laughter. “Nope!” he said again.

I pulled the covers over my head, finished with the conversation. Little Boy chortled to himself and went to unpack his stuff.

When my husband came in, he was looking quite pleased with himself as well. I was out of bed by then, and I commented on what great time he had made on the road trip.

“You must have gotten up early!” I said. “Did you have any trouble on the drive?”

“Nope!” he said. “I had a plan.”

Grinning in much the same manner as his son, my husband revealed all.

DAD’S ROAD TRIP PLAN:

  1. Take the twins to the movies.
  2. Give them all the sugary snacks they want.
  3. Tell them they can stay up all night.
  4. Go to bed and let them roam free in the house.
  5. Wake up early and load them into the van.
  6. Have a peaceful drive while they sleep the whole time.

I was so shocked by this plan, I think my jaw hit the floor. I can certainly see why this  was not revealed to me in advance. I would NOT have approved it.

The twins, apparently quite refreshed by their road-trip naps, danced in and out of the room, wearing, “Dad let us stay up all night!!” expressions of glee.

I guess there’s a new cool parent in town.

In Her Sibling’s Eyes

Boo, my fifteen-year-old daughter, told me about a boy at her school who keeps awkwardly showing up near her and telling her she looks beautiful. She finds this embarrassing, apparently.

I was talking about this over the phone one day, because (a) it’s kind of funny and (b) I’m rather proud to have a daughter who is so pretty that awkward boys are compelled to comment. (No one EVER said anything of this nature to me in high school. Or at any other time, actually.)

Anyways, Little Girl, my ten-year-old, heard this conversation and said incredulously, “Wait. Someone thinks Boo is pretty?!”

I said, “Yes, of course. Don’t you think your sister is pretty?”

“NO!” she said, quite contemptuously. “She’s MEAN.”

Well. There’s a younger sister’s perspective, I suppose.